Tag Archives: Williams

Formula One: 6th consecutive fastest pit stop award for Williams

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The Williams Martini Racing pit crew secured a 6th DHL fastest pit stop award at the Monaco Grand Prix. The team are so far unbeaten in 2016 when it comes to pit stop times. Official timing suggests the team’s quest to achieve a sub 2 second pitstop, with the team coming within one tenth of the time at the Chinese Grand Prix, and again at the Spanish Grand Prix.

The efficiency of the Williams pit stop process has not gone unnoticed from the world away from Formula One with the team recently working in partnership with University Hospital of Wales to fine-tune the resuscitation of premature newborn babies.

The top 6 fastest pit stops from the Monaco Grand Prix:

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If the DHL fastest pit stop award is new to you, check out this film:

To find out more about the DHL Fastest pit stop award click here.

Formula One: Massa’s Monaco helmet design

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Williams Martini Racing have released images of Felipe Massa’s special edition Monaco helmet design. Under FIA regulations it is understood Massa will not be permitted to use the helmet during on track sessions, although it is possible the team have agreed a form of  dispensation.

The penatly for electing to run an alternative design is believed to be financial only, it could be that Massa or Williams have elected to pay a fee in order to use the design. The helmet design itself comes from Brazilian Street Artists OSGEMEOS translated as “THETWINS”, Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo.

More information on OSGEMEOS can be found here

Further design images:

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Formula One: Williams saving lives

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Williams has been assisting the neonatal unit at the University Hospital of Wales (UHW) in Cardiff by bringing Formula One pitstop know-how to help in the resuscitation of newborn babies.
Recognising the similarities between neonatal resuscitations and Formula One pitstops, the resuscitation team at UHW invited members of the Williams Formula One team to the hospital last year for an exploratory meeting to discuss how Formula One techniques and processes could be incorporated into their work. Wednesday 4th May saw members of the neonatal team from UHW visit the Williams factory in Oxfordshire to observe the team practice pitstops to see first-hand how they operate.
Both scenarios require a team of people to work seamlessly in a time critical and space-limited environment. In Formula One, a pit crew can change all four tyres on a car in around two seconds, with a team of nearly 20 people working in unison to successfully service a car. Williams has a dedicated human performance specialist who works with its pitcrew to fine tune the technique, processes, team work and health and fitness of team members. Their experience previously treating new-borns in clinical practice has facilitated the transition of knowledge between the two industries and they have been the primary advisor to the hospital. Williams’s pitstops have been a real success story for the team in 2016, recording the fastest stops of any team at each of the first four races of the 2016 Formula One season.
Following these site visits, the neonatal team has identified and started implementing a number of changes to improve its resuscitation processes that are based on those used in Formula One racing. The resuscitation equipment trolley has now been audited and streamlined to ensure that equipment can be located as quickly as possible. The neonatal team have mapped out a standardised floor space in delivery theatres to clearly show the area for the neonatal resuscitation team to work in; copying the customised floor map the Williams team takes to races to map out the specific pit box requirements at each track. The pitstop resuscitation team at UHW are also in the early stages of implementing Formula One communications and analysis techniques, including the use of a “radio-check” prior to a resuscitation, greater use of hand signals rather than verbal communication, and video analysis to analyse performance following a resuscitation with debrief meetings as standard.
Speaking about the project Dr Rachel Hayward, specialist registrar in Neonates at the University Hospital of Wales said; “Resuscitation of a compromised neonate at delivery is time critical, requiring the provision of efficient and effective resuscitation to ensure an optimal outcome. Delays in providing effective resuscitative care can have marked consequences on survival or the development of long term complications. There is a growing amount of evidence to support a systematic approach to resuscitative care which is time-critical and dependent upon optimal team dynamics and clear communication. Analogous with the requirements of an effective pitstop we have worked with the Williams team to implement Formula One techniques and processes to augment neonatal resuscitative care”.
Claire Williams, Deputy Team Principal of Williams, added; “When we were approached by the Neonatal team at the University Hospital of Wales last year to offer some advice we were delighted to assist. Their work is vitally important and the pressure they work under is difficult to comprehend; it’s a matter of life and death every day of the week. If some of the advice we have passed on helps to save a young life then this would have been an extremely worthy endeavour. We are increasingly finding that Formula One know-how and technology can have benefit to other industries and this is a great example.”

Formula One: Rexona promote Magnit partnership through Williams in Sochi

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Lead Williams F1 team partner Rexona (Unilever deodorant brand known as Sure in the UK) are promoting an innovative new partnership with Russian retailer Magnit with revised branding on the FW38 for the Russian Grand Prix.

Magnit branding features on the rear wing endplate of both Valtteri Bottas and Felipe Massa’s in tomorrow’s Russian Grand Prix.

In addition Rexona are promoting the brands key antiperspirant in Russia – Cobalt on the FW38 SPLEF. In so doing the driver numbering has been moved to the top left section of the rear endplate.

With Bottas and Massa starting 2nd and 4th on the grid respectively (having qualified 3rd and 5th), Magnit and Rexona will be more than satisfied with the exposure.

Valtteri Bottas: I’m very pleased with our qualifying performance; it was the maximum result I think we could have achieved, and my lap in Q3 was very good. It now puts us in a very good position for the race and we need to focus on turning a good qualifying, into a good race performance. This is a track that I really like and normally do well at, and it’s a track that suits our car. The new parts we have introduced are helping us, so the team at the factory and track have done a good job in improving the car. We have some fast cars starting behind us which will make the race difficult, but a podium will be the target.
Felipe Massa: It was a good qualifying for us as starting P2 and P4 is positive. We were a bit lucky with the penalties for Ferrari and Mercedes but I think it was definitely a good session. We just need to concentrate to have a good race tomorrow. Anything is possible and it’s probably the best track for us so far this season, so we’ll try and put everything together in the race.

Formula One: Williams Fw38 reveal in detail

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The new Williams Mercedes FW38 was unveiled today ahead of the first pre-season test in Barcelona, Spain next week.
For a third successive season the iconic red, white and blue stripes of WILLIAMS MARTINI RACING will be lining up on the Formula One grid, with the team looking to build on a successful 2015 season that resulted in four podiums and a third place finish in the Constructors’ Championship.
Commenting on the new FW38 Sir Frank Williams, Founder and Team Principal, said; “Williams has started to cement our position back amongst the front running teams after finishing third in the Championship in the past two seasons. This has been a great achievement given the resources of those around us. Staying where we are will be a challenge in itself, but we are determined to keep improving because only winning will ever be good enough.
“We have a very stable team going into 2016, with Felipe and Valtteri teaming up for a third successive season. They work well together and both have the ideal blend of speed and consistency. Our technical team has also remained very consistent which will be to our advantage and we have some of the best engineering minds on the grid at our disposal.
“We have a busy couple of weeks of testing coming up to learn more about our package and to refine the car ahead of the first race. We will have to wait until Melbourne to find out exactly where we stand in the pecking order but I’m confident that our hard work over the winter will stand us in good stead.”
Felipe Massa added; “Securing third in the Constructors’ Championship for two consecutive years is a great achievement and one that comes with a lot of expectation – a momentum which I am excited to build on going into the new season. The team at the factory have worked really hard on the new car and we have spent a lot of time understanding where we need to improve. I have a lot of confidence in the team at Williams and I’m looking forward to getting behind the wheel of the FW38 to see how it performs. I’m equally delighted to be teammates with Valtteri for another year. He is a very talented driver who brings a lot to the team.”
Valtteri Bottas, who is about to embark on his fourth season in Formula One with Williams, said: “This is always a really interesting and exciting time of the year because we have a new car and we can’t wait to get it out on track to see how it feels and how fast it is. It’s been a good winter and from what I’ve seen we seem to be headed in a good direction with this car. Testing next week will be our chance to see how our performance has improved since the last race. The development of the FW38 has been all positive in theory, now we just need to see it on track.
“As a team we need to be able to win races, which is what we are always trying to do. I’m sure we have made improvements everywhere as a team, so we’re definitely looking to fight for better results this year. I’d like to thank everyone at the factory for their hard work over the winter in getting the car ready.”
Claire Williams, Deputy Team Principal, concluded. “2016 promises to be a very competitive year in Formula One and there will be a number of strong teams who have us in their sights. We are confident that we have made a step forward over the winter and that the FW38 will build on the strengths of the FW37 and address some of its weaknesses. We started design work on the car earlier than normal and hopefully this extra development time will stand us in good stead.
“The car we are launching today is by no means the final product. We are already planning updates for Melbourne and will be pushing for constant improvements over the course of the season. Williams enters 2016 in a strong place. We have a great team of people and over the past two years we have started to regain our competitive edge. Now we need to build on that and take this team back to where we all want it to be.”
The FW38 will take to the track for the first time on 22nd February for eight days of testing that concludes on 4th March. The season officially gets under way at the first race in Melbourne, Australia, on 20th March.
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Williams Mercedes FW38 Reveal: A Q&A with Pat Symonds
As Williams unveils its 2016 challenger, Pat Symonds, Chief Technical Officer talks through the development and design of the Williams Mercedes FW38 ahead of the first test in Barcelona.
Q) What was the conceptual thinking behind the FW38?
A) The FW37 was a pretty effective car and so we concentrated on understanding the areas where we could improve it without losing the attributes which made it effective. It is no secret that the low speed performance of the FW37 didn’t match its high speed performance so a lot of time was spent looking into why this was and subsequently making changes, which we hope will improve the situation. On top of this we looked at the normal physical obstacles to development that one always meets during the life of a car and tried to push those barriers back.
Q) When did the design process start?
A) This is always slightly difficult to answer precisely as one is always discussing the path of improved performance with the senior engineers. However in mid-January 2015, before the FW37 had even run, we held a meeting to try and work our way through a concept ‘shopping list’ and to narrow down the areas in which we hoped the FW38 would out perform its pre-nascent forerunner.
As we started running the FW37 we could see more clearly the design directions we wanted to take with the next car and at the same time started laying out the basic architecture such that critical path items would hit their design release targets.  The monocoque and gearbox, for example, fall into this category as both need considerable time, not just in design but also in structural analysis.
Q) Other than a host of new cars what else does 2016 bring?
A) Well we have very few changes to the technical regulations. As always we are trying to improve safety and so the cockpit sides adjacent to the driver’s head are not only higher but they are also significantly stronger.
Something the spectators may notice more is that the engines will sound a bit sharper. Over the winter we can expect more power from improved combustion and this will in itself produce a bit more noise but perhaps more significantly the turbo wastegate is no longer plumbed into the main exhaust. This should not only produce an engine note that is around 12% louder than before but may also from time to time trigger some of the dramatic sounds we all associate with high performance turbo charged engines.
Q) So technically not much change – what about the sporting regulations?
A) Here we can expect to see much more change particularly with regard to tyre usage. It has long been recognised that the more prescriptive a set of rules are, the more similar the outcomes of a competition will be. With this in mind it was decided to introduce an additional fifth tyre compound at the soft end of the spectrum and, more importantly, give the teams greater freedom in the choice of tyres they use.
While I don’t think this is an earth shattering change it still has the potential to spring the odd surprise from time to time.
Q) What about Williams – how will 2016 pan out for the team?
A) One can never tell because no matter how much effort you put in and no matter what the magnitude of your improvements all things in sport are relative.  This means the outcome of the season is not just a function of your efforts but those of your competitors as well.
At Williams we are honest about our mistakes and try to learn from them. Just as in the design of the car we always analyse strengths and weaknesses, so we do with the team. This has led to several operational changes for 2016 which, although not particularly visible from the outside, should see the team better able to cope with the many variant scenarios that racing will inevitably throw at them.
One strength we take into 2016 is stability. It is easy to underestimate the power of this but with the same driver pairings and continuity in the engineering team we hope to be up to speed quickly – something particularly important with only 8 days of pre-season testing.
Q) So predictions for 2016 then…
A) I have been in the sport far too long to fall into the trap of making predictions. Over the last couple of years Williams has regained the competitive spirit it was so long famous for. I want to harness and augment that spirit and use it to drive us forward in a progressive manner while always keeping a strategic eye on the future and in particular the big changes due for 2017.

Formula One: Gary Paffett joins Williams

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The Williams F1 Team have announced that Gary Paffett has been appointed as the team’s simulator driver for 2016.
Gary has joined the team for the 2016 season to assist the vehicle science department in developing the Williams Mercedes FW38 at the Williams factory in Grove. He will work closely with the team throughout the year to provide extensive feedback to help the continued development of this year’s car.
Gary’s previous experience includes being a McLaren test driver, the 1999 McLaren Autosport BRDC award winner and 2005 DTM champion. Between 2001 and 2013 Gary took part in 72 official Formula One test days, completing 4971 laps and clocking up 22,745 km in the process.
Commenting on the announcement Gary Paffett said: “I am really pleased to be joining the Williams team as the simulator driver to aid in the development of this year’s car. The team has such a great pedigree and history in Formula One. I look forward to supporting the team over this year in my new role.”
Claire Williams, Deputy Team Principal, added, “We’re delighted to have someone with Gary’s experience join us at Williams. He is a highly professional racing driver and his level of testing knowledge, and ability to analyse data, will significantly help to drive forward development of the FW38 throughout the season.”
Gary Paffett joins the teams expanding driver rooster with alongside main driver’s Felipe Massa, & Valtteri Bottas. Reserve and Development driver Alex Lynn, and development driver Lance Stroll.

Formula One: Williams Martini Racing and Wihuri Continue Partnership

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Williams F1 team have confirmed a renewed partnership agreement with Wihuri, one of Finland’s most respected business enterprises, for the 2016 Formula One season.
The Wihuri logo will now feature on the front wing endplate of the upcoming Williams Mercedes FW38. The Wihuri logo will also feature on the drivers’ helmets and overalls, as well as team clothing.
Headquartered in Finland, Wihuri is a global industry and trade conglomerate engaged in packaging products, daily goods wholesale operations, technical trade investment products and aviation. Over the past century, Wihuri has grown from a small family business into a diversified global enterprise which operates in 20 countries. It is still owned by the family that formed the company 110 years ago. Wihuri first became a partner of Williams in May 2012, but their heritage in motorsport sponsorship dates back to the 1970s.
Juha Hellgrén, President and Chief Executive Officer of Wihuri, commented; “The team is continually working to improve its performance, and Valtteri is gaining more experience every race. Our customers love the F1 spirit and we all hope for even more success during the coming 2016 season. Wihuri is thrilled to be continuing its partnership with Williams Martini Racing and we are proud of everything that we have achieved together so far”.
Claire Williams, Deputy Team Principal and Commercial Director of Williams, added; “We have received fantastic support from Wihuri over the past four seasons and we are delighted to confirm that they will be continuing as a partner in 2016. Wihuri has deep historical roots in motorsport and this knowledge and passion allows us to create exciting marketing campaigns together. With their countryman Valtteri Bottas behind the wheel of the FW38, we look forward to celebrating more success together.”