Tag Archives: F3

F2, F3, F4: Erreà Sport join Prema

unnamed

Italian clothing Manufacturer Erreà Sport continue their rapid growth throughout Motorsport with the announcement of a new partnership with Prema for 2017 and beyond.

Joining the ranks of the Sauber F1 Team, Mahindra Formula E team, & Manor Endurance Racing, this new partnership will see Erreà Sport represented across F1, F2, F3, F4, Formula E, and the World Endurance Championship, with further partnerships in motorsport in development.

Fans of Erreà Sport in motorsport can find the online store for the Sauber F1 Team and Mahindra Formula E team though this link. Highlights of the Prema and Manor Endurance Team collection will be made available in the coming weeks.

The 2017 Prema team wear collection is a result of coming together of minds between the Prema and Erreà Sport design teams. The collection reflects the teams Italian heritage and team history, alongside ensuring functionality for the team in races around the world.

Commenting on the partnership René Rosin, Team Principal, remarked:
“We are proud to partner an excellent Italian company like Erreà for what is expected to be a particularly demanding season. Like in all professional sports, also in racing every single component can make a difference and Errea, to whom we will entrust our personnel, will definitely be a key component of the team”.

Errea Sport Chairman Angelo Gandolfi added:
“We are delighted for this new and prestigious partnership. Prema and Erreà share the same values and represent a dynamic, efficient and determined combination, looking forward to score great results in the upcoming season. We worked hard together with the team in order to provide them with all the support they need to keep pushing the limits forward.”

unnamed(1)

To keep up to date on  Prema through the 2017 season in motorsport you can follow them on Twitter here.

Advertisements

Formula One: Force India’s Future?

18 year old Jehan Daruvala might not be a house hold name just yet, but his success on the British & European Go Karting scene and Formula Renault 2.0 over the past two season’s alongside the likes of 2016 Mclaren Autosport BRDC Award Winner Lando Norris, suggest he could be name to watch out for in the coming years.

Finishing 3rd in Sahara Force India “One in a Billion” programme in 2011. A campaign which saw bought together and nurtured the greatest racing prospects across India. Jehan relocated to the UK to pursue a full time career in motorsport. Jehan remains a firm part of the Sahara Force India academy as they support his development through junior categories with a long term ambition which will see him take to the wheel of an F1 car.

Earlier this month Jehan announced he will join Carlin Racing for the 2017 season, taking part in the European F3 championship. A championship which over the past two seasons has become more of a feeder series to F1 than GP2 with Max Verstappen, Esteban Ocon, and Lance Stroll head to the F1 following their success in the ultra competitive championship. Could Jehan sit alongside Esteban Ocon with Sahara Force India in 2018? Only time will tell.

To keep up to date with Jehan’s progress follow him on twitter here

Kids and Motorsport

screen-shot-2016-10-19-at-16-03-29

Some of my earliest childhood memories are of watching Formula One on the TV with my dad. Sitting together to watch our heroes racing against each other on a Sunday afternoon created a very special father son bond, something we have maintained to this day. From the moment my children were born I’ve been looking forward to the day I can start taking her to racing events with me.

Over the past year I have set about forging a career in motorsport, whilst the financial aspect of this career choice is taking a bit more time to come together than I might have hoped, developing a network within the industry is coming along nicely. It was through this network I found myself in the position to be able to take my daughter (6) and eldest son (3) to the closing rounds of the European F3 championship and DTM championship in Hockenheim last weekend.

As a bit of a racing obsessive it is very easy to forget the intricacies of motor racing and just accept them as a given. Taking the time to explain them to my children made me take stock and start to question a few of the accepted norms.

This first occurred when explaining qualifying. When the DTM cars first went out on track my daughter, Isabelle, asked if they were racing now. I explained, they were out driving as fast as they can to decide what position they will start the race in. Without any hesitation, she replied “so the fastest starts as the back?” to which I explained the opposite was the case “but that’s boring, no one will overtake like that” came her reply. It’s such a simple point, but entirely fair. If the fastest start first how can we expect an entertaining race? Don’t get me wrong I completely take on board the traditionalists view of going racing, but it’s very hard to argue with a child’s logic.

screen-shot-2016-10-19-at-16-05-07

Our tickets for the weekend came from friends in an F3 team. At short notice they had arranged Paddock tickets for us. When we arrived at the circuit our host took the time to meet us at the circuit entrance and take us over to the paddock on the back of her quad bike. My son, Ben, would tell you, as he has all his friends, that was the real highlight of the day! Being given paddock tickets for a race is and will always be, a huge thing for me, but when it came to watching racing Isabelle made another observation. “why can’t we sit in the Stadium [grandstand]?” my reply “We don’t have tickets for the grandstand, we’ve got a good view of the track here” to which she replied “but there are so many empty seats, why can’t we just go and sit there?” Again she made a valid point. Why do fans simply accept empty grandstands and find a hill to watch the racing on. Sure I could have paid for a grandstand seat, but to be honest I wasn’t sure they would sit through an entire race. If circuits have empty seats, and fans sitting around the circuit, why not just open up the grandstands. Create a positive atmosphere and people will be more encouraged to come again, and pay for other activities at the circuit.

On to the racing itself, DTM worked fantastically for kids, well for my kids at least. During qualifying we each picked our favourite car, by colour of course, Isabelle went for the Pink Mercedes (Mücke Motorsport, Chrisitan Vietoris, & Lucas Auer) I went for the Red & White Shell BMW of Augusto Farfus, and Ben went for the Yellow BMW post van driven by Timo Glock. Each car has a digital read out on the side window displaying the drivers position in the race. Each lap Isabelle and Ben had to tell me what position their car was in and if they had move up or down from the last lap. As the race progressed this developed into telling me the position of the Red Bull cars, or the make of the car in first. The race flew by and despite our drivers not winning both Ben and Isabelle were able to explain the race to an impressive level of detail.

screen-shot-2016-10-19-at-16-04-21

Supporting the F3 and DTM was the Porsche Supercup, it was impressive to see that in addition to huge hospitality areas, Porsche had invested in creating a road safety area for young children. Children were given a tutorial on crossing roads safely and watching out for traffic lights and other simple road signs, then given 20 minutes to roam around a specially laid out circuit in peddle powered go karts and scooters. Whilst for an adult it might not sound overly riveting, my kids loved it. Plus, it gave me a chance to sit down for a few minutes!

Overall my first experience of Motorsport with children was positive, The DTM set up feels far more family friendly than my experiences of Formula One, there are activities for all ages, teams and drivers are happy to make time for you and the racing is easy to follow and not too long.  Leaving the circuit Isabelle talked about what she had enjoyed during the day and what our next racing experience would be, casually mentioning informing me I’d be taking her to a Formula One race to meet Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg. No pressure then!

Formula One: Indycar vs. F1. The Drivers Championship

Screen Shot 2016-08-21 at 10.41.17.png

As a Driver, if you compare the gravitas of succeeding in Formula One to Indycar, on the face of it, Formula One is the ultimate accolade. Exploring the physicality of each series tells a slightly different story.

Current era F1 cars are both lighter and more powerful than an Indycar. They produce more downforce and utilise higher performing brake performance. However, they also feature power steering. An Indycar is heavier, less powerful, produces less downforce and critically has no power steering.

In recent interview for JWGP Felix Rosenqvist following his test for the Chip Ganassi team at Mid Ohio commented, “it doesn’t matter how fit you are, the first few laps in an Indycar destroy you. I’ve not driven in F1, but compared to my time in DTM, GT’s and F3, the physical strength required to drive those cars is much greater”

You see it in an Indycar driver’s physique, they train to build physical upper body strength much more than cardio work. Completing an Indycar race is far more physically demanding than an F1 race under current regulations. Current leading F1 drivers such as Daniel Ricciardo have acknowledged this and called for the 2017 regulations to place more emphasis back towards the driver.

The variety in circuits is another unique component to the challenge of Indycar. Over a single season driver’s will visit; street circuits, road courses, long ovals, and short ovals. Each configuration requires a very different style of driving ranging from man handling a car around St Pete, to driving like you re holding a cup of tea you can’t spill around Indianapolis. Drivers can’t afford to specialise in one style of racing. To win in Indycar you have to be strong in all circuits. As Will Power explains in the film below from Mobil One’s The Grid:

Ultimately Formula One elevates a driver’s profile to global super stardom, but is Indycar the real human test of raw skill? With former F1 driver, now Indycar winner Alex Rossi opting to complete his season in Indycar rather than return to F1 with Manor Racing this season perhaps the tide is turning. Indycar has created an environment in which driver skill and strength is key, the economics of the series enable drivers to earn a living with reduced pressure around finding a budget to race.  Has Indycar quietly become the new home of the real racing driver?

Formula One: Doping in Motorsport

Screen Shot 2016-03-06 at 12.34.59

The IAAF, International Association of Athletics Federation, has come under intense scrutiny in recent months for the way in which it chooses to respond to a growing number of reports of failed doping tests for competitive athletes.

Motorsport until now has seen very few incidents in which competitors have been found to have fallen foul of the rulebook. It was with interest then to discover in the FIA AUTO publication that of doping tests carried out amongst competitors in 2014, 3.6% delivered a positive result. The article does not detail the total number of tests carried out, or the series in which the tests took place, but 3.6% is an alarmingly high number.

The FIA is a signatory to the World Anti-Doping Code, and so is bound by the List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (found here) this is the same code to which the IAAF is a signatory.

The FIA are tackling the issue head with the introduction of the ‘Race True – Anti Doping Educations Programme’ led by Sandra Silveira-Camargo, FIA head of Medical Affairs. The first session of this sort took place at the Belgian round of the World Endurance Championship. Should the training prove successful it will be repeated through F1, WRC, WRX, WTCC, F3, and Formula E.

Whilst no details of what constituents a positive result in a doping test have been revealed, nor the names of any participants involved. The 2014 results show that the issue of doping in motorsport does exist and it can not be ignored.

The FIA Auto Magazine from which this information was sourced can be found here